Speeding

In traffic terms, speeding is driving at a velocity that is unsafe for road conditions or a velocity that exceeds the speed limit posted. People speed everywhere, all the time, but in certain situations and on certain types of roads, speeding is associated with serious, extreme, and often deadly consequences. Speeding is a factor in one-third of all automobile fatalities.

Why do people speed?

People choose to speed for a wide range of reasons. Most often, people are in a hurry and do not think that going above the posted speed limit will put them at risk. People speed to varying degrees, and their chance of incurring injury is directly related to how much over the speed limit they drive.

Studies have shown that people who drive two-door sports cars or convertibles are more likely to speed, which suggests that for some people, the decision to speed is related to the image of themselves they would like to project while on the road.

Speeding is always dangerous. People often fail to realize that speed limits have been considered and determined by city planners who are familiar with the traffic system. These people know every detail of the roads, including turns, curves, bumps, and any other conditions that the driver may not be aware of until it is too late.

Most often, by the time a speeder encounters a difficulty and attempts to rectify his/her speed it is already too late. An increased speed will also increase the force of the impact during a crash, meaning that more damage will be done to the automobile and the people inside.

Speeding and Drunk Driving

Drivers who speed while intoxicated are more likely to cause serious accidents than drivers who speed while sober.

Between 2000 and 2002, the combination of alcohol and speed contributed to 13.7% of fatal traffic accidents. Alcohol alone contributes to 12.7% of fatal crashes, and speed solely contributes to 14.7% of fatal crashes. Therefore, alcohol and speed, or both, are factors in 41% of all fatal accidents.

Take a look at the measurement methods to see how your speed is tracked.